Canada! Radical Trust

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Soumis par katie.2 2010-07-14 08:18:20 HAE

Thème(s) : L'acquisition des compétences numériques

Sommaire

Canada is positioned to advance in the digital economy if she can make the leap forward to adopt a new philosophical approach to online living.

The current approach of delivering internet connectivity to users at a high price, and a low quality, will never work, not even delivery of high price good quality service will work. What will give Canada the leap forward is the delivery of free, unregulated, high quality internet. Only this will lead to leadership in online service and markets.

Additionally, the attempt to brand Canada within the bandwith will not work, as traditionally nobody really cares where you are, the brand is the quality of service, and the consistency of this quality service that counts. If Canada invests in education, and network, and acquired a brand in the process, it will always be secondary consideration and subservient always to the unequivocal requirement for delivery of good service.

The persistent complaint to businesses trying traditional marketing and service approaches on the internet is that they cannot easily build a market base to pitch to, and that when they build one, it can disappear suddenly, overnight. One of the ways to begin to address this problem is to provide a place for people to live in the network. For free, forever.

The final subject for consideration, is the philosophic code that has evolved in the net. It is a place where people are seeking and have found at great breadth, equality, free speech, educational opportunity, love and art. It is a place where trust is everything, and success follows trust everywhere you go online.

In attempting to police the internet, with privacy regulations, and copyright regulations, it is important to investigate and address the core issues around the copyrigh issue, and to balance regulations around safety issues with learning and freedom.

So three key steps to ensure Canadians have success in the network.

A place to live
Trust — radical style
A carefully balanced regulatory environment for privacy and copyright protections.


Soumission

Canada! Radical TrustFootnote 1

Katie Campbell

Katia.campbell@gmail.com
http://katieforcouncillor.blogspot.com/

Summary

Canada is positioned to advance in the digital economy if she can make the leap forward to adopt a new philosophical approach to online living.

The current approach of delivering internet connectivity to users at a high price, and a low quality, will never work, not even delivery of high price good quality service will work. What will give Canada the leap forward is the delivery of free, unregulated, high quality internet. Only this will lead to leadership in online service and markets.

Additionally, the attempt to brand Canada within the bandwidth will not work, as traditionally nobody really cares where you are, the brand is the quality of service, and the consistency of this quality service that counts. If Canada invests in education, and network, and acquired a brand in the process, it will always be secondary consideration and subservient always to the primary requirement for delivery of good service.

The persistent complaint to businesses trying traditional marketing and service approaches on the internet is that they cannot easily build a market base to pitch to, and that when they build one, it can disappear suddenly, overnight. One of the ways to begin to address this problem is to provide a place for people to live in the network. For free, forever.

The final subject for consideration is the philosophic code that has evolved in the net. It is a place where people are seeking and have found at great breadth, equality, free speech, educational opportunity, love and art. It is a place where trust is everything, and success follows trust everywhere you go online.

In attempting to police the internet, with privacy regulations, and copyright regulations, it is important to investigate and address the core issues around the

copyright issue, and to balance regulations around safety issues with learning and freedom.

So three key steps to ensure Canadians have success in the network.

  • A place to live
  • Trust - radical style
  • A carefully balanced regulatory environment for privacy and copyright protections.

Innovation Using Digital Technologies

Should Canada focus on increasing innovation in some key sectors or focus on providing the foundation for innovation across the economy?

Access to the infrastructure is the key to innovation. Canada currently has one of the most prohibitive networks in the world in terms of access. And this is due to the practice of throttling competition which leads to overpricing, and the inappropriate habit that has formed in Canada of discriminatory slicing of services into multi tier options on sub standard networks.Footnote 2 It is not appropriate to make the argument that the internet needs to be regulated and segregated into different classes of service with multi tiered pricing for three reasons: a) the state of the existing infrastructure does not justify doing this - it is an old network that requires upgrades, not marginalizing users into different classes because of a lack of investment to upgrade the network. This is infuriating. b) it is inappropriate to consider multi-tiered access and regulation when the global trend is to offer unfettered access to users who have found a multitude of ways to be innovative and entrepreneurial and c) it is inappropriate to relegate people of lower income to inferior access to significant learning tools, and/or business opportunities.

Canada, needs to invest in the infrastructure to deliver service to homes, businesses, educational institutions and non profits - at speed and unregulated. This will generate innovation.

Take for instance, Google, who has discovered and built on the notion that it is appropriate to give people their place to live in - for free. In doing so, everybody has access to quality email and document management services, and Google knows where to find relevant data to index and serve up. Don't like the ads? Think it's creepy that they scan your email for keywords? Get used to it, and understand that once you go digital - privacy bets are all off. Does this mean we are to operate in a 'Wild West' atmosphere? No. But there are ways to address this issue outside of traditional avenues. It is not an either or proposition.

The Google StoryFootnote 3 by David Vice and Mark Malseed is a very interesting look at the company because it explores ideas beyond the business transactions. It sets up the ideas of how to live in the network in a fruitful and important way, by taking a look at the business end of Google, but also at the philosophical as well. The point I am trying to make it that there is another way to approach life in the net, and we need to consider ways that are not traditional if we are to go forward successfully.

Which conditions best incent and promote adoption of ICT by Canadian business?

Stop gouging people with high internet access fees, deliver reliable high-speed connection, and make it free. The business, innovation and creativity is within the network, not the connection; the change in philosophical and business approach that needs to happen right at the connection.

Most people believe that the internet is the world's best example of a democracy at work.

What would a successful digital strategy look like for your firm or sector? What are the barriers to implementation?

The key is to be able to build stable markets in the network. This is not possible if people cannot afford the service. There is no mystery here. Provide free access and you will be able to develop a stable marketplace.

Internet and cellular users are still struggling with the costs of going digital. The turnover is impossible to manage from a business prospective if people are never where you think they are going to be. Users cannot maintain the heavy service charges and are continually searching for a more feasible option. This explains the success of Skype and Google Voice. It is the free place to live; the stability that everyone has been looking for.

There is good data coming out that visualizes the future in terms of traffic and user behaviour, in terms of looking at market share for business. A good example is the work done in examining the changes and challenges for newspapers and digital online offerings.Footnote 4

Once copyright, anti-spam and data breach/privacy amendments are in place, are their other legislative or policy changes needed to deal with emerging issues?

It is important to make clarification on the point that nobody 'owns' the internet. We as Canadians may 'own' a certain part of the infrastructure, of the pipeline, but that is all.

I do not agree with ISPs tracking and undertaking to 'regulate' the service. This is invasion of privacy. It is like submitting each letter you write for scrutiny before you get to put it in the mailbox at Canada Post. It is unacceptable.

How can Canada use its regulatory and policy regime to promote Canada as a favourable environment for e-commerce?

The regulatory environment is separate from the online experience in this instance. Online transactions are not geographic in terms of marketing or branding. The services that are available, for example, PayPal, have had success, as has Interac online money transfers and online bill payments. The problem in Canada is competition, or the lack of it. The notion of branding Canadian e-commerce services online is moot. Nobody cares where you are - just that the service is fast, reliable, and trustworthy. Canada has nothing to do with it. Give people the place to work and live for free and they will build business online that will build our economy for the next hundred years.

Digital Infrastructure

What speeds and other service characteristics are needed by users (e.g., consumers, businesses, public sector bodies) and how should Canada set goals for next generation networks?

Canada needs to invest in infrastructure, in delivery, in financing the undertaking so that long-term upgrades can be met.

Deliver this free to every citizen in the country.

What steps must be taken to meet these goals? Are the current regulatory and legislative frameworks conducive to incenting investment and competition? What are the appropriate roles of stakeholders in the public and private sectors?

  • Improve competition
  • Improve CRTC
  • Roles of stakeholders in public and private sectors.

Public sector delivers the capacity for the private sector to access the service. Public sector ensures free competition in the network and private sector builds its base for business transactions, learning and health services, to mention the few obvious. The 'new economy' in the network!

What steps should be taken to ensure there is sufficient radio spectrum available to support advanced infrastructure development?

I think this should be a public works project, with particular attention given to requirements and monitoring and evaluation.

The infrastructure will advance and change regularly, the key will be to set up proper financing mechanisms that will ensure regular upgrades.

How best can we ensure that rural and remote communities are not left behind in terms of access to advanced networks and what are the priority areas for attention in these regions?

Internet is critical for rural areas. It is compatible and reflective of the idea of having a flat access to the network. Rural areas can be services through infrastructure upgrades and better wireless services.

There is continual discussion on upgrading the existing infrastructure, but there are also options to explore/develop satellite delivery options - as stand-alone or as augment for rural delivery of internet service.

An example of this service: http://www.galaxybroadband.ca/home-satellite-internet-service.html

Growing the ICT Industry

Do our current investments in R&D effectively lead to innovation, and the creation of new businesses, products and services? Should we promote investments in small start-ups to expand our innovation capacity?

Investments in R&D need to be spread a little more broadly to encourage innovation and advances in the sector.

Invest in small start-ups, invest in the next iteration of product, invest in companies that are willing to do the work, and protect them when they are faced with leveraged buyout scenarios.

What is needed to innovate and grow the size of the ICT industry including the number of large ICT firms headquartered in Canada?

Deregulate communications industry.

Encourage competition

Support/build complimentary business sectors - phone and/or software designer/producers

What would best position Canada as a destination of choice for venture capital and investments in global research and development mandates?

Take Canada out of the equation. Just plan to build and support the best business environment possible - and the investors will follow.

What efforts are needed to address the talent needs in the coming years?

Develop:

  1. Ethical business policy for this sector. This is important; it will attract top-notch talent in this and future generations.
  2. Develop broad, comprehensive, and innovative educational plans that reach all subject matters. There is a problem when you have good technical graduates but they have no understanding of specialities or sector processes.
  3. Develop supports (financial and R&D) in complimentary business sectors and create the linkages for students, business and users to connect.

Canada's Digital Content

What does creating Canada's digital content advantage mean to you?

The biggest thing to understand is the concept. That means Canada must deliver a network where people can live day to day, without interference of billing and restricted access. Once people are 'home' in their networks, they will invest in meaningful ways, and that will create industry. If we get this right, we will have the advantage in terms of content, business, and social progress.

What elements do you want to see in Canada's marketplace framework for digital media and content?

We pay taxes that pay for the roadways we drive on, and for the sidewalks we walk on, the buses we take and for the healthcare we enjoy in our daily lives. If we are going to develop our digital lifestyle, then it must be visualized as part of our everyday infrastructure, the same as a sidewalk or bus service. We must deliver the digital infrastructure as a compliment to our current services in aid of social and market welfare and development.

How do you see digital content contributing to Canada's prosperity?

If we provide the infrastructure, and people can actually 'live' in the network, then it will become another option for people to invest in to better their personal, social and business circumstances.

The nature of the digital content will evolve and describe itself better with a different kind of uptake than we have now. That is where the growth industry is in terms of business and positioning for the future.

How can stakeholders encourage investment, particularly early stage investment, in the development of innovative digital media and content?

Well, the stakeholders are : Public Sector, Private Sector, Educational Sector, Non-Profit and Business Sector

Other than the Public Sector, there are no real viable options to develop the national infrastructure in a way that is appropriate for the remaining stakeholders. It will fall to the government to undertake to develop and deliver this service and to ensure that it is available equally and fairly to all.

I do not believe that we are at a stage in the development of the network to define and deliver the exact media and/or content in the exact experience that people will want.

This innovation and creativity that you are requesting and looking to support will erase any attempts to codify and/or regulate the environment at this time.

The internet has not been truly accessible for most people as they continuously struggle to find the affordable mix of service/price to stay in one place for a period of time. Once that problem is addressed, the internet will come into full bloom - and, I suspect, it will not resemble the current business models 'out of' the network.

Building Digital Skills

What do you see as the most critical challenges in skills development for a digital economy?

Make a commitment to a public network.

Make a commitment to R&D

Acknowledge and reward creativity, philosophy and art in this sector.

A casual glance through the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) websiteFootnote 5 gives one a good idea of the issues, but the one resounding agreement is that the internet remains unfettered and that people continue to exercise freedom in the travels in the network. A good paper on this can be found at the Internet Society website, on Preserving the User Centric Internet.Footnote 6

What can we do to ensure that labour market entrants have digital skills?

Well, labour market entrants will not be the same segment you describe as will be found in the 'new economy'.

Lots of people will, and already have, grown up living in the network and will be way ahead of us in terms of digital skills.

Invest in solid education from primary to university, and incorporate the digital learning skills at every stage. It is a lifelong learning enterprise and it is worthy of our attention in positioning Canada as the leader in this sector, but more importantly, in positioning Canadians as happy, healthy, productive citizens.

You cannot seriously think to invest money and time educating for a particular application; the focus has to be logic and philosophy, specialization and/or interests right behind in conjunction with a national education plan for Canada.

What is the best way to ensure the current workforce gets the continuous upskilling required to remain competitive in the digital economy? Are different tactics required for SMEs versus large enterprises?

The most important thing to do is to integrate digital learning skills at all levels of education. The notion of investing too much time and/or money on skills that are quickly outdated when newer technology and or applications are introduced, is sad and distressing for those who have studied hard to acquire the skills. Invest in delivering broad and solid education, invest in broad and solid 'digital' concepts, and core competencies. Training on specific applications can be delivered as electives at all education levels, or through workplace learning, or through online learning in the digital 'new economy' in the network.

How will the digital economy impact the learning system in Canada? How we teach? How we learn?

The digital economy will push Canada to adopt a national learning plan/strategy and will ask more of the local school boards in terms of a) paring down and b) having a very directed mandate to identify local market training requirements for the elective courses as identified above.

Education can/will be delivered online more and more often, and this will push educational institutions to focus more on the quality, integrity and philosophy of their institutions.

The internet is nothing but learning. How we assess and direct or influence that learning will be the trick for the future.

Improving Canada's Digital Advantage

Should we set targets for our made-in-Canada digital strategy? And if so, what should those targets be?

The targets:
Policy - by 2012
Requirements - by 2013
Delivery - roll out started 2014 completed - 2016

What should the timelines be to reach these targets?

Let people participate (online) to determining what they want in terms of policy and protections. This means reaching out beyond traditional stakeholder groups, and it means facilitating the input and integration of the broader stakeholder communities. It is a tricky balance, and 'people' will very definitely want a say in how this is evolved, just as they have a say, and sway online right now.

The internet was not created as a giant marketing or business machine; it was created to be a network for sharing information in a fast, efficient and free manner. This is where people want to live, and this is where you will find your constituents.

Ensure a democratic and transparent process in addressing governance.

It is already late for getting started.

Overcoming Underinvestment in Information and Communications Technologies

There is a debate from all sides on this issue, some will say it is taxesFootnote 7 and others will say not enough competitionFootnote 8 but the truth is that the whole methodology of making money has changed, and people do not want to be limited by artificial constructs that force them to utilize sub-par products, services or information. There is no interest or sympathy for a company that has spent years overcharging, under investing and siphoning funds out of the company - be it for investor dividends, acquisitions, or whatnot.

The ethics of doing business in the digital economy will rule, and the best thing companies and individuals can do to plan for the future, is to get schooled in the ethical requirements of living in the net.

Protecting the Online Marketplace

There is no protecting our online marketplace.

That approach is old and will not work for the future. Educate entrepreneurs to operate ethically, in the understanding of the new online economy, which is the only way to ensure success for Canadians as businesses on the network.

The copyright dilemma is complicated by a number of factors. Nobody wants to see people lose their copyrights, but it is galling, as in the music industry, to have to pay for the same product, in different format, over and over again. I personally think it is criminal, and were I a lawyer, would think to pursue this line, but I am not and not everyone thinks as I do.

If people are stable in where they live in the network, it will be easier to track, maintain, and deliver a fair copyright law.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9kV8QLpYC8&feature=channel_page

Footnotes

  1. 1 http://www.radicaltrust.ca/about/ (back to footnote reference 1)
  2. 2 http://www.thestar.com/news/sciencetech/science/article/770697--we-overpay-for-slow-old-internet-study (back to footnote reference 2)
  3. 3 http://www.thegooglestory.com/ (back to footnote reference 3)
  4. 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9kV8QLpYC8&feature=channel_page (back to footnote reference 4)
  5. 5 http://www.cippic.ca/about-us/ (back to footnote reference 5)
  6. 6 https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http://www.isoc.org/pubpolpillar/docs/usercentric_en_2008.pdf (back to footnote reference 6)
  7. 7 http://www.backbonemag.com/Magazine/CoverStory_07010701.asp (back to footnote reference 7)
  8. 8 http://www.zdnet.com/blog/government/canadian-government-overrules-crtc-allows-globalive-to-offer-mobile-services/6467 (back to footnote reference 8)

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Guylaine Verner
Industrie Canada | Industry Canada
300, rue Slater, Ottawa ON K1A 0C8 | 300 Slater Street, Ottawa ON K1A 0C8
Guylaine.Verner@ic.gc.ca
Téléphone | Telephone 613-990-6456
Télécopieur | Facsimile 613-952-2718
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